A sampling of images and text from the Smithsonian's Threaded, the go-to source for all things historical and sartorial — edited by Emily Spivack (@emspivack).
Sep 20, 2013

The Story of Elizabeth Keckley, Former-Slave-Turned-Mrs. Lincoln Dressmaker: Striped and floral Mary Lincoln dress, attributed to Keckley, significantly altered from original design. Smithsonian National Museum of American History.

Sep 19, 2013

The Story of Elizabeth Keckley, Former-Slave-Turned-Mrs. Lincoln Dressmaker: Mary Lincoln’s purple velvet skirt and daytime bodice are believed to have been made by African-American dressmaker Elizabeth Keckley. The first lady wore the gown during the Washington winter social season in 1861–62. National Museum of American History.

Sep 18, 2013

The Story of Elizabeth Keckley, Former-Slave-Turned-Mrs. Lincoln Dressmaker: Elizabeth Keckley.

Sep 17, 2013

The Story of Elizabeth Keckley, Former-Slave-Turned-Mrs. Lincoln’s Dressmaker: Mary T. & Lizzy K. runs through May 5, 2013, at Arena Stage at the Mead Center for American Theater. Illustration by Jody Hewgill.

Sep 17, 2013

'I Remember': An Artist's Chronicle of What We Wore: Ad for Flagg Bros. shoes, 1970s.

Sep 7, 2013

'I Remember': An Artist's Chronicle of What We Wore: Woman with beehive working an IBM accounting machine, 1960s.

Sep 6, 2013

'I Remember': An Artist's Chronicle of What We Wore: Singer in pillbox hat, 1958. Lesley University Archives via Flickr.

Sep 5, 2013

'I Remember': An Artist's Chronicle of What We Wore: Sack dress, 1949. Image from carlylehold via Flickr.

Sep 4, 2013

'I Remember': An Artist's Chronicle of What We Wore: The cover of Joe Brainard’s I Remember.

Sep 3, 2013

The History of the Flapper, Part 5: Who Was Behind the Fashions? “Where there’s smoke there’s fire” by Russell Patterson, 1920s.

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